Fitness and Figure Posing Guide
Front Relaxed Pose

The front relaxed pose is actually the most difficult of the poses for most competitors to master.

Begin all poses by establishing the proper foot placement.

In the Front Relaxed pose, your front foot should be facing forward toward the audience, your back foot should be slightly behind the front foot and turned at a 90 degree angle from the front foot.

We use the term "butt up" to describe how you should hold your hips and butt during these poses.

You should arch your back into a "C" shape and lift your butt up as high as you can lift it. This will give your butt and hamstrings the best look possible.

Your torso should be twisted slightly in the direction of your front facing leg, so that your body is visible to the audience and judges.

Keep your stomach in, your chest out, your back in the "C" curve position, and your "butt up".

( Easier said than done! This one takes a lot of practice )

The arm on the side of your front facing foot should be slightly bent and held out to the side of your body.

It should not be extended out dramatically from your body, and it should not be in too close.

( See the pictures above for the proper placement )

Keep your head up high and confident in every pose, and always keep a big smile on your face.

Be sure to practice this pose from both sides, as you never know which side of the stage you will be on.

Front Pose

The front pose begins by setting your feet so that they are together and facing the front of the stage.

Your knees and legs should be together, and you should flex your thighs to the outside as if you were trying to rotate your knees outward while still keeping your legs together. This will bring out the separation in your thighs.

Your butt should be "up", your back should be in the "C" curve, your chest should be out, and you should be doing a vacuum with your abs so they are in and tight.

Imagine you are holding a beachball with your arms.

Your arms should be slightly bent, and held slightly in front of your body.

Your arms should not be too far out to the outside of your body, and they should not be too far out in front of your body.

Keep your head up high, and keep a big smile on your face.

 

Side Pose

Begin the side pose by facing the side of the stage with your feet together.

Bending your legs slightly will allow you flex your hamstrings.

Your butt should be "up" in this pose and you should have the "C" curve in your back with your chest out, your stomach in, and your head up high.

Contrary to what you see in some pictures, you should not turn your head to face the audience. Your head should face the side of the stage and you should have a big smile on your face.

Your arms should be slightly bent and tight. Your hands should be aligned so that they are lined up with the middle of your thighs from the side. Your arms should not be pulled excessively to the back, or be out in front of your body.

 

Rear Pose

The rear pose begins by facing the back of the stage with your feet together.

Your butt should be absolutely as high as you can get it, and you should have an extreme "C" curve in your back.

Lifitng your butt up like this really gives the best look to your glutes and hamstrings from the rear.

Spread your lats as wide as you can spread them and move your arms and hands slightly in front of your body.

Imagine you are holding a beachball again so that your arms are slightly bent and spaced in a similar fashion to the front pose.

Keep your head up high and take advantage of the fact that you are facing the rear to get in a few good deep breaths.

 

Last but not least, the Victory Pose!

Hold your hands up high and celebrate your victory!

Good luck with your posing!

Featuring IFBB Pro Fitness competitor Kendra Elias

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

www.KendraElias.com